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Money for Nothing, the Cricks for Free

Five Paradoxes in EU Migration Policy

Abstract

The conflictive targets of achieving security for itself, and assuring basic human rights for irregular migrants, have led to paradox EU migration policies. The increasing perception of (uncontrolled) immigration as a potential security threat has contributed to a migration approach that is driven primarily by principles of defence and deterrence. Focusing on the Mediterranean region, this article points to five paradoxes, in areas where EU immigration policies and actions not only fail to reach their targets but often generate opposite outcomes. This comes at high costs in terms of financial contributions and human losses. in addition, these policies unnecessarily reduce the EU’s negotiating power in other policy fields. The article concludes with recommended changes in EU migration policies and calls for an end to the hitherto security-dominated approach to migration.

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Völkel, J.C. Money for Nothing, the Cricks for Free. CMS 2, 151–180 (2014). https://doi.org/10.5117/CMS2014.2.VOLK

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Keywords

  • European Union
  • Migration Policy
  • Stockholm Programme
  • Securitization
  • Frontex
  • Readmission Agreements
  • North Africa
  • Arab Spring