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  1. The study of international migration and responses to it has experienced rapid growth in the last three decades: an institutionalisation of migration studies. This paper identifies and specifies infrastructural a...

    Authors: Lorenzo Piccoli, Didier Ruedin and Andrew Geddes
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:16
  2. Insider family citizens—that is, people who, according to their nationality/legal status and the possession of crucial resources for the settlement of their relatives in a foreign context—occupy an especially ...

    Authors: Paola Bonizzoni and Asuncion Fresnoza-Flot
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:13
  3. In this rejoinder we argue, based on the papers of this commentary series, that ‘race’ is such a tricky notion because it can be used in (at least) two very different and contradictory ways—as a concept to disent...

    Authors: Tabea Scharrer and Sawitri Saharso
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:11
  4. Ethiopia is one of the major origins for international migrants to the Middle East in Africa regardless of the risks and the abuses that migrants face. The study aims to analyse the determinants of internation...

    Authors: Beneberu A. Wondimagegnhu and Lemlem Fantahun
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:12
  5. There is a paucity of scholarship examining the situated vulnerabilities of young women refugees who are either born in (second generation) or young children/adolescents on arrival in their host country (“1.5 ...

    Authors: Tamaryn L. Crankshaw, Jane Freedman and Victoria M. Mutambara
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:10
  6. Over the years, some scholars have not only written against the concept of immigrant integration but have called for its rejection and abandonment. Critics argue that the concept is normative, objectifies othe...

    Authors: Senanu Kwasi Kutor, Godwin Arku and Elmond Bandauko
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:9
  7. Since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, people have been worried about COVID-19. As one of the risk groups, persons aged 65 and older are especially vulnerable. Additionally, minorities and migrants are h...

    Authors: Sarah M. Ludwig-Dehm, Iuna Dones and Ruxandra Oana Ciobanu
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:8
  8. In this paper, we analyze the relationship between development and outgoing international student mobility (ISM) for the years 2003–2018 using data from UNESCO. Starting from migration transition theory, we ex...

    Authors: Tijmen Weber and Christof Van Mol
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:5
  9. During the 2015 “summer of welcome”, the mass arrival of refugees to Germany triggered widely publicised acts of pro-refugee solidarity among citizens. To date, scholarship has largely focused on hostility tow...

    Authors: Lucas G. Drouhot, Karen Schönwälder, Sören Petermann and Steve Vertovec
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:4
  10. This contribution investigates the intersection between macro-level political narratives on diversity and micro-level lived experience of social inclusion and everyday interaction. The case studies for analysi...

    Authors: Andrea Carlà and Marcus Nicolson
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2023 11:2
  11. With a recent surge in the outward movement of the population, a new wave of emigration has been suggested to have started in Hong Kong. It is speculated that recent socio-political changes in Hong Kong may ha...

    Authors: Anita Kit Wa Chan, Lewis T. O. Cheung, Eric King-man Chong, Man Yee Karen Lee and Mathew Y. H. Wong
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:49
  12. Reciprocal migration—which we define as the mutual exchange of origin and destination by two different migrating groups—is hardly acknowledged in the migration literature. In terms of the temporalities of migr...

    Authors: Asaf Augusto, Elisa Alves, Russell King and Jorge Malheiros
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:43
  13. The aim of this paper is to map the emergence and development of a research field around the topic of “gender-based violence (GBV) against women with precarious legal status and their access to social protecti...

    Authors: Claudia Di Matteo and Roberto Scaramuzzino
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:40
  14. This manuscript describes findings from 53 interviews conducted with Moroccan and migrants from The Democratic Republique of the Congo living in Belgium, with an emphasis on discussing the extent to which envi...

    Authors: Loubna Ou-Salah, Lore Van Praag and Gert Verschraegen
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:36
  15. The global spread of the coronavirus pandemic has particularly dramatic consequences for the lives of migrants and refugees living in already marginalised and restricted conditions, whose ongoing crisis is at ...

    Authors: Claudia Böhme and Anett Schmitz
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:34
  16. This article analyses how states adapt generic policies to the increasing diversity that characterises contemporary European societies. More particularly, it zooms in on how migration-related diversity is main...

    Authors: Laura Westerveen, Ilona van Breugel, Ilke Adam and Peter Scholten
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:31
  17. The current era of globalization is accompanied by vulnerabilities of migrants at their destination. Although such cases possibly shape the vulnerabilities of migrant-sending households through the network of ...

    Authors: Linger Ayele and Terefe Degefa
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:30
  18. The reintegration of return migrants has been an important issue in migration studies for several decades. While much research has been done to identify returnees’ strategies and their labour market situation ...

    Authors: Agnieszka Trąbka, Luka Klimavičiūtė, Olga Czeranowska, Dovile Jonavičienė, Izabela Grabowska and Iga Wermińska-Wiśnicka
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:29
  19. This paper focuses on the intra-EU movement of young adults from Finland, Poland, and Spain who have settled, short- or long-term, in London and its wider region. In our comparative analysis, we find that the ...

    Authors: Saara Koikkalainen, Aija Lulle, Russell King, Carmen Leon-Himmelstine and Aleksandra Szkudlarek
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:26
  20. To test the contagion effect of fear migration between countries, and to show its causality direction, our paper contributes to the economic literature by providing a new study based on migration fear indices ...

    Authors: Hassan Guenichi, Nejib Chouaibi and Hamdi Khalfaoui
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:20
  21. It is well known that children of immigrants experience inequality. Less is known about how inequalities compare across multiple life domains and multiple generations. We conduct a case study of England and Wa...

    Authors: Matthew Wallace, Ben Wilson and Frances Darlington-Pollock
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:18
  22. This paper deals with non-citizen voting rights from the perspective of grassroots initiatives that campaign for more inclusive local voting rights for migrants. It looks at three initiatives in three European...

    Authors: Katrin Sontag, Metka Herzog and Silva Lässer
    Citation: Comparative Migration Studies 2022 10:17

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